Sex and the City: Season Six (Part I)

January 28, 2012 17 Min Read

Review by: Matt Brighton

Plot: What’s it about?

One of three prominent shows to call it quits this year; “Sex and the City” actually did it in the prime of its popularity. I write this only minutes after watching the series finale of “Friends”, and while a much more popular show it’s safe to say that “Sex…” had more than its fair share of fans (myself included). However it isn’t all roses now that “Sex and the City” is over and done with. No way, that would be too easy. There was talk of a movie after the show was over, but word had it that Kim Cattrall and Sarah Jessica Parker were never too fond of each other and it fell apart. Ok, no movie – what next? Well, as I write this review this isn’t even the complete sixth season, it’s just Part I. And I, along with many other fans, are quite ticked about it. This season, or part of it anyway, contains the first twelve episodes and leaving the last six (the finale was a two-parter) for a soon to be mentioned Part II. Now here’s what doesn’t make sense: As “Friends” wrapped today, a DVD of the season finale will be in stores next week (this will sound dated in the future, but right now it’s pertinent information) whereas the finale of “Sex and the City” was last February and now we have to wait for what has already been over for months?! Maybe I’m out of the loop, but I just don’t get it. All that aside, this season found the girls right back to where we liked them – having fun. Carrie (Sarah Jessica Parker), free from Aidan, started the dating scene again and met what could be the man of her dreams in Aleksander Petrovsky (Mikhail Baryshnikov). Charlotte (Kristin Davis) and her husband Harry (Evan Handler) are in search of a child and Miranda (Cynthia Nixon) and Steve (David Eigenberg) move out of Manhattan to the lovely Brooklyn! Samantha had the hardest time when she finds out that she has breast cancer. Suffice it say that this first part (actually 2/3) of the season had more ups than downs – and take that however you want. It’s really a shame that HBO has not only made us wait, but we’ll have to wait even longer to finally have the complete series on DVD. Below are some episode synopsis to recap the first twelve episodes.

“To Market, To Market” – Carrie finally manages to set up a date with fellow author Jack Berger, but the situation makes Carrie as nervous as she is ecstatic. Charlotte finds herself in a tough situation. Against all odds, she is falling deeply in love with Harry, but he can’t get serious about her because she’s not Jewish. Things aren’t any easier for Miranda, who finally admits to herself that she’s in love with Steve. After much soul-searching, she decides to tell him during a dinner “date”, but he beats her to the punch by revealing that he’s already in an another relationship. Miranda’s spirits plummet, and she keeps her feelings to herself…

“Great Sexpectations” – Samantha introduces the girls to a “raw foods” restaurant, she discovers that she wants something that’s not on the menu… a date with the hot waiter. Unfortunately, Samantha isn’t the only woman interested in the staff. Charlotte announces that she is going to convert to Judaism. The conversion is easier said than done, however, as Charlotte’s attempts to meet with a rabbi are repeatedly rebuffed…

“The Perfect Present” – Carrie and Berger move firmly into the next phase of their relationship with Carrie making the first trip to Berger’s apartment. While pleasantly surprised that Jack’s apartment does not say “scary bachelor”, Carrie is less thrilled when Berger uses the visit as an opportunity to open the dreaded “ex-file”. Dealing with the new relationship of her ex, Steve, proves difficult for Miranda; particularly, when a diaper-bag discovery forces her to realize that the relationship is indeed moving forward, at least in the bedroom. Charlotte continues her conversion with an accelerated course in the Jewish faith. But doubts arise when she realizes that becoming Jewish means giving up some of her own traditions…

“Pick-A-Little, Talk-A-Little” – Samantha and Jerry’s sex life is heating up, with the pair acting out several different fantasies in the bedroom. Sometimes Jerry plays an IRS agent, other times a doctor… but the scenarios always end with a steamy bedroom encounter. Miranda tries to test Berger’s theory about men in her daily life — namely that men don’t send hidden messages to women — but this backfires badly on Miranda when she goes out with a man and misinterprets her date’s stomach ailments for a lack of interest. Charlotte takes to her new role as a Jew with great vigor. She peppers her conversations with Yiddish phrases and cooks Harry a massive dinner for their first Shabbat together…

“Lights, Camera, Relationship” – Carrie takes Berger on a date to Prada. Berger initially feels like a fish out of water in the upscale retailer, but a few comped glasses of champagne help him to relax. Unfortunately, no amount of alcohol can help him deal with the sticker shock brought on by the price of a shirt that Carrie wants him to buy. Samantha continues her burgeoning relationship with Jerry, even going so far as to travel to Brooklyn to see him in a play. The show (“Full Moon”) bores her into numbness until Jerry steps onstage and drops trou. Sadly, Miranda and Charlotte aren’t doing as well as Samantha in the relationship department. Charlotte is still smarting from being dumped by Harry, while Miranda’s feelings for Steve continue to grow…

“Hop, Skip And A Week” – Carrie gets tapped for jury duty, and she finds herself unable to talk her way out of performing her civic obligation. Sadly, this is the least of her problems, as her relationship with Berger is becoming more and more forced by the moment. imperiled is the bond between Miranda and baby Brady. Miranda’s career puts more and more demands on her time, and Brady begins to see Magda as his mother figure since his real mother is never home. Samantha, as usual, doesn’t seem to be having any problems at all. Her guidance of Smith’s career is going swimmingly. She manages to get him a gig as the “Absolut Hunk”, which brings with it a several story tall billboard in Times Square…

“The Post-it Always Sticks Twice” – Carrie and the girls are meeting for their usual breakfast when two bombshells are dropped. The good news is that Charlotte and Harry are engaged… but the bad news is that Berger dumped Carrie via a Post-it note earlier that morning. Charlotte absolutely basks in the glow of her engagement to Harry. Her ring is enormous (and patterned after the one given by Richard Burton to Elizabeth Taylor), and all seems well. All, that is, except for the nagging feeling that somehow this second marriage will be somewhat less special than her first. Miranda is also in a funk until discovering that after many months of juggling motherhood and a career she is now able to fit into her “skinny jeans” for the first time since 1985…

“The Catch” – While relating this situation to the girls, Harry appears and introduces Carrie to his best man for the upcoming nuptials. After much coaxing, Carrie allows herself a one-nighter with her fellow member of the wedding party, but winds up wildly unsatisfied after he proves to be a less than sensitive lover. Charlotte and Harry’s wedding day arrives, but much to the bride’s chagrin, nothing seems to work out properly. First, Harry sees Charlotte while she tries on her gown, sending Charlotte into a panic…

“A Woman’s Right to Shoes” – Carrie and Stanford attend a baby shower thrown by their friends Kyra and Chuck. Upon arriving, they discover that Kyra’s house rules include the removal of all footwear, regardless if doing so will destroy a carefully crafted outfit. Miranda finds herself with three separate problems: an open apartment in her building, Brady suffering from the chickenpox and her own growing need for male companionship. Luckily, one person solves all three problems, as Dr. Robert Leeds takes the vacancy and helps Miranda care for her sick child. Samantha’s dislike for misbehaving children comes to a head in a fancy restaurant. While a child babbles loudly in the background, Sam is admonished for daring to speak on a cell phone…

“Boy, Interrupted” – Carrie receives a pleasant surprise when her high school boyfriend, Jeremy (David Duchovny), calls her up and asks her to meet for dinner. The pair broke up in High School, but their chemistry leads them to instantly reconnect. The New York City summer heat is driving Samantha crazy, but equally frustrating is her inability to be granted access to SoHo, an exclusive club that features a fabulous swimming pool. Luckily for Sam, she finds a misplaced ID card that grants her access to the club, so long as she doesn’t mind answering to the name Annabelle Bronstein…

“The Domino Effect” – Big is back in New York, but unfortunately, he’s returned to Gotham to undergo an angioplasty. Carrie does not react well to this news, breaking down into tears whenever the subject comes up. The waterworks don’t subside, even when Carrie visits Big after the procedure, making her realize that Big is somebody that will always be under her skin. Charlotte’s ever present desire to conceive intensifies after a chance meeting with the very-pregnant Bitsy Von Muffling. She learns that Bitsy attributes her condition to the wonderful treatments of a Dr. Mao…

“One” – Carrie and Charlotte make a visit to a gallery where a performance artist has placed herself on display without any food or water. While viewing the exhibit, famed Russian artist Aleksandr Petrovsky takes notice of Carrie, but disappears into the crowd before she can point him out to Charlotte. Robert surprises Miranda by giving her a giant cookie with the words “I Love You” written out in chocolate chips on it. Miranda realizes that she’s not able to respond in kind to him (the words, not the cookie), and she worries that she’s never going to be able to express her feelings to anybody…

Video: How does it look?

As with the previous two seasons of Sex and the City, these are presented in their original aspect ratio of 1.33:1. For a series this new, I really think that these could look a bit better. When I see movies and other television shows (like “Friends”) that look better, it really boggles my mind. Still, there is some artifacting in some dimly lit shots and for the most part the colors are strong. The flesh tones are accurate, though we see the women in so many different settings it’s hard to tell what they “really” look like! Still, a strong presentation throughout makes for a good viewing. Essentially, expect the same as from the last three seasons.

Audio: How does it sound?

While we have become so used to things being “re-mastered” in Dolby Digital 5.1, we tend to overlook the things that don’t really need that “power” to excel. Sex and the City, as with the two previous seasons, is presented in a basic Dolby Surround track. There are no major flaws here, just the audio as you most likely heard it either on the DVD or when it aired on HBO. Still, it’s not a bad thing as split surrounds or discrete effects couldn’t do a whole lot for our four heroines. The dialogue is witty and presented without a single flaw, and the more “umph” of the tracks takes place during the opening credits, but if it’s a “Saving Private Ryan” track you’re looking for you won’t find it here, just some women looking for some love and we can hear every minute of it in good ‘ol Dolby Surround.

Supplements: What are the extras?

The discs contain the usual amount of supplements that the first five (well, four and a half assuming you don’t count season five as a full season) seasons did. Each episode contains a trailer and there are four commentary tracks on the disc by Michael Patrick King. Commentaries on “To Market, To Market”, “Great Sexpectations”, “Boy, Interrupted” and “One” are all about the same. King is proud of his work and we learn a lot about the production of the show, he speaks of the finale and of working with the actresses. These are all pretty straightforward, but die hard fans will love listening to them. There is also a 30 minute feature with the cast of the show at The Museum of Television and Radio that was done October 2003. They dissect the show, its cultural impact and speak of the characters they play. It’s interesting and shows just how far the series’ roots go, but does tend to get a bit dull mid-way through. And that’s it. Want more? You’ll have to wait, but if you’re dying for twelve more new episodes on DVD; then that wait is over…

Disc Scores

VIDEO
AUDIO
EXTRAS
OVERALL